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 Crop Insurance and Risk Management Information

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Insurance Information by Crop

Crop insurance is offered by crop and by county. It is available for the crops listed below. Fact sheets and other information are made available by the USDA Risk Management Agency nationally and by region. Check their Raleigh regional office for New York-specific fact sheet updates.

Whole Farm Revenue Program
This year, the Whole Farm Revenue Crop Insurance Program is being offered by the USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA).   It is based on a combination of AGR and AGR-lite, with some important improvements.  They have prepared a great deal of information about the program that is available on their website.  Please visit: www.rma.usda.gov/policies/wfrp.html for fact sheets, to view the policy and to watch their PowerPoint about the program.

Whole Farm Revenue Protection: Recording | Slides

The Whole Farm Revenue Program can be compared to the NEW, Improved NAP coverage available from your county Farm Service Agency (FSA).  You can learn more about NAP by visiting the FSA website and by watching our 20 minute video about NAP. You can also download our NAP presentation with speaker notes.

Examples of WFRP:
Combining Corn and Soybean Crop Insurance with Whole Farm Revenue Protection | Pdf
Risk Management Opportunity for New York’s Diversified Growers | Pdf
Whole Farm Revenue Protection Can Include Revenue from Purchases for Resale | Pdf
Whole Farm Revenue Crop Insurance Compared to NAP Disaster Protection | Pdf
Beef Production and Whole Farm Revenue Protection Crop Insurance | Pdf

Fruit (Apples, Grapes, Peaches, Tart Cherry Pilot)
Crop insurance policies are available to protect fruit crop growers against adverse weather conditions, price fluctuations and unavoidable pests and diseases. Please see individual RMA fact sheets for fruit crop insurance coverage, as well as additional information provided by USDA RMA about the coverage.

Farmer Interview – Jim Bittner, peaches, plums, cherries | Article
Farmer Interview – Chip Bailey, apples | Article
Farmer Interview – Bruce Kirby, apples | Article
Farmer Interview – Darrel Oakes, apples, grapes | Article
Farmer Interview – Dan Sievert, apples, peaches, tart cherries | Article
Farmer Interview – Charlie Pettit, apples, corn, soybeans, clover seed | Article
Farmer Interview – Dave Johnson, you pick apples | Article
Farmer Interview – Raymond Krupa, juice and wine grapes | Article

Fact Sheet: Apples (on USDA RMA Website) | Pdf
Fact Sheet: Grapes (on USDA RMA Website) | Pdf
Fact Sheet: Peaches (on USDA RMA Website) | Pdf
Fact Sheet: Tart Cherry Pilot (on USDA RMA Website) | Pdf

Field Crops (Corn, Corn Silage, Grain Sorghum, Soybeans)

Corn, Corn Silage and Soybeans Crop Insurance | Slides | Recording
New York State Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Corn | Example | Organic Corn
New York State Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Soybeans | Examples | Organic Soybeans
New York State Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Corn Silage | Examples

Dairy Farmer David Wood spends 3 minutes on the 4 components of insuring corn silage | Video | Article

Projected prices for 2016 Small Grains
Harvest Prices, November 2015


RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Corn | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Soybeans | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Grain Sorghum | PDF
RMA Information Regarding Insurance for a Crop Following a Cover Crop | PDF

Example of How to decide if crop insurance can work for you – | Slides | Recording

Farmer Interview: Mr. X, field crops | Article
Farmer Interview: Jeff & Jim Allen, field crops, processing vegetables | Article
Farmer Interview: Dairy Field Crops – David Wood | Video | Article
Farmer Interview: Field Crops – Brian Andrews | Video | Article
Farmer Interview: Beginning Farmer, Organic Field Crops – Peter Martens | Video | Article
Farmer Interview: Field Crops – Craig Phelps | Video | Article
Farmer Interview: Organic Field Crops – John Myer | Article
Farmer Interview: Organic Grains – Luke Gianforte | Article

Crop Budget Worksheets for Grain Corn, Soybeans, Wheat (Excel)

Marketing Organic Grains, by John Berry, Penn. Extension | PDF

Small Grains (Barley, Oats, Wheat)

Brewery & Distillery Grains NYS Crop Insurance | Fact Sheet
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Barley | PDF

Spring and fall-planted barley can be insured in 44 counties, malting-type barley can be insured in 4 counties, and winter wheat can be insured in 27 counties. Oats crop insurance is available in 46 counties. See the availability chart in the crop insurance basics section for more information.

RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Small Grains | Pdf
June 2013 USDA RMA Fact Sheet on Vomitoxin Testing for Wheat 2013 | Pdf
USDA RMA Fact Sheet on Aflatoxin Loss Adjustment Procedures for crop insurance | Pdf

Vegetables (Cabbage, Dry Beans, Green Peas, Onions, Potatoes, Processing and Fresh Market Beans, Sweet Corn, Tomatoes)
Vegetable crop insurance is available by county. Updated vegetable fact sheets are routinely available at the RMA website and here in January or February of the year the crop is planted. Vegetable crops covered include: onions (12 counties), processing green beans (18 counties), fresh market green beans (9 counties), cabbage (Monroe, Ontario, Orleans counties), processing green peas (17 counties), fresh-market sweet corn (all but 8 counties) and processing sweet corn (11 counties), processing tomatoes (6 counties), and potatoes (15 counties). Non-insured Assistance Program (NAP) coverage was improved by the 2014 Farm Bill and provides similar (but not the same) protection as crop insurance. NAP-65 refers to the fact that producers can pay additional fees to go beyond 50% coverage, up to 65% coverage. NAP is purchased from your county Farm Service Agency, where detailed information is also available.

RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Cabbage | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Dry Beans | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Green Peas | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Potatoes | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Fresh Market Beans | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Processing Beans | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Memo on Processing Beans/Soybeans Similar Crop | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Fresh Market Sweet Corn | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Processing Sweet Corn | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Processing Tomatoes | PDF
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Onions | PDF

Farmer Interview: Vegetable Crops – Larry Eckhardt Video | Article
Farmer Interview: Vegetable Crops – Mark Henry | Article

Nursery and Greenhouse Crops
New applicants can sign up for this multi-peril crop insurance any time, however, coverage begins after a 30-day waiting period. Renewing applicants must sign up by May 1. The policy is complicated. In addition to multi-peril crop insurance, Whole Farm Revenue coverage is available to New York State growers.

RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Nursery | PDF

Pasture, Hay and Forage
Producers throughout New York State can insure hay, forage and pasture against lack of rainfall during the insured period. The premiums are subsidized by the federal government and pay-offs are related to a rainfall index. The Pasture, Rangeland, Forage (PRF) sign-up deadline is November 15th. Please visit the RMA website for more information at www.rma.usda.gov/policies/pasturerangeforage.

Pasture, Hay, Forage Presentation | Pdf
USDA RMA Fact Sheet: pasture hay forage | Pdf
Risk Management Options for Forage in New York State | Pdf
Quality Loss Provisions and Example for Forage under Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) | Pdf

New York Fact Sheet | PDF

Forage Seeding and Production
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Forage Production (on USDA RMA Website) | Pdf
RMA Crop Insurance Fact Sheet: Forage Seeding | Pdf

Dairy & Beef Producers
Dairy and beef producers growing their own feed and grain can insure those crops as they see fit. Dairy farmers discuss the benefits of insuring their crops, including corn silage, in interviews and articles.

Farmer Interview: Dairy - Russ Kelly | Article
Farmer Interview: Dairy - Elma Phillips/Tax Preparer | Article
Farmer Interview: Dairy - Lynn & Peggy Murray | Article
Farmer Interview: Dairy and Field Crops – Tony and Nick Gilbert | Video | Article
Farmer Interview: Dairy – Ron Robbins | Video | Article
Farmer Interview: Dairy/Forward Contracting – Ron Robbins | Video
Farmer interview: Organic Dairy – C. Thomas Trinder Video | Article
Farmer interview: Dairy – Judi Whittaker Video | Article
Farmer interview: Organic Dairy – Robert Zufall Video | Article
Farmer interview: Organic Dairy – John Stoltzfus Video | Article

Dairy & Beef Producers Crop Insurance Opportunities | Pdf

Livestock Gross Margin for Dairy Manual by Dr. Brian W. Gould, University of Wisconsin | Pdf

LGM-Dairy:
LGM-Dairy (Livestock Gross Margin) insurance covers the difference between the projected gross margin (or insurance guarantee) and the actual gross margin. A loss payment (indemnity) results when the projected gross margin exceeds the actual gross margin. Futures prices from the Chicago Mercantile Exchange are used to determine the value of milk and feed. Producers can enroll at the end of every month either a small amount or their entire milk production. For more information, contact your crop insurance agent. Producers who sign up for MPP are not eligible to use LGM-Dairy.

Publication: USDA’s Livestock Gross Margin for Dairy: What is it and How Can it be Used for Risk Management, by Dr. Brian W. Gould and Dr. Victor Cabrera, University of Wisconsin | Pdf

University of Wisconsin LGM-Dairy Website, Dr. B.W.Gould
Go to the LGM-Dairy Analyzer, click on the Premium Estimator tab, then click on Upload a File, and follow the prompts.

The 2014 Farm Bill replaced the MILC program with the Margin Protection Program.  The USDA Farm Service Agency is administering the program. An on-line tool for is available for viewing margin patterns. Several academics are comparing margin protection using MPP to LGM-Dairy, which appears to be substantially more expensive for similar protection.  Initial educational material, is available at the following websites: - www.fsa.usda.gov/mpptool
www.dairymarkets.org/MPP 

Apiculture
The Pasture, Rangeland, Forage (PRF) Rainfall Index crop insurance program provides coverage for apiculture in New York up to $118 per colony, using rainfall indices as an indicator of plant health and hive production. Please visit the RMA website for more information at www.rma.usda.gov/policies/pasturerangeforage. Another key program is the USDA Farm Service Agency ELAP program for bees, New York Information on Crop Insurance Options for Apiaries | PDF. See: www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=diap&topic=elap

Beginning Farmers
Beginning farmers, defined as those with less than five years in production for crop insurance program eligibility, may find the risk protection offered by crop insurance is invaluable to their fledgling farming operation. They also face some challenges in terms of navigating the options and getting their records in place to qualify. Crop insurance premiums are more heavily subsidized for beginning farmers.

Beginning Crop Yields for Insurance Purposes | Recording

USDA RMA’s Beginning Farmer Fact Sheet | PDF

Farmer Interview: Beginning Farmer, Organic Field Crops – Peter Martens | Video | Article

Farmer Interview: Beginning Farmer, Organic Field Crops – Chris Simons | Article

Organic
Crop insurance is available for organic corn, soybeans and wheat in counties where crop insurance is offered for these crops. Organic farming practices for crop insurance purposes apply. Contract prices may also be used for crop insurance purposes. Contract Price Crop Insurance Addendum (Applicable to Organic Only) | RMA Fact Sheet

Crop Insurance for Organic Producers (Recording | Pdf)

Farmer interview: Organic Field Crops – Kurt Forman Video | Article

Grain Marketing & Risk Management:
Marketing grains is considered a critically important component of managing risk by the USDA’s Risk Management Agency. In 2012, NYS harvested 680,000 acres of grain corn, 475,000 silage corn, 85,000 acres of wheat, 312,000 acres of soybeans, 50,000 acres of oats and about 8,000 acres of barley. Two written resources cover the basics of grain marketing. The first deals with conventional grains and is written by John Berry, an extension agent with grain marketing expertise. The second is co-authored by John Berry and Sarah Johnston from NYSDAM, and addresses the current market development of organic grains in New York. The webinars below, recorded in 2011, are still pertinent and timely for the growing market for organic grains.

Grain Producers and Risk Management: A Marketing Overview | Pdf
Overview: Marketing Organic Grains in New York State | Pdf

Grain Marketing Recorded Sessions:

  • Organic Food Grain Marketing: Organic Food Grade Production Considerations, with guest speakers Erick Smith, Mary-Howell Martens, Klaas Martens, Thor Oechsner, April 19, 2011 (Videos of March 14, 2011 Farm to Bakery Presentation, Geneva, NY: (Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Contacts List)

Requesting Insurance Not Available in Your County
If you would like to request insurance on a crop that is not insurable in your county, but is insurable in other counties, you may complete and submit a Request for Actuarial Change through a crop insurance agent. It can also be used to modify the existing terms and conditions in the crop insurance policy when specifically permitted by the policy. Please see the fact sheet on Requesting Insurance Not Available in Your County. These written agreements require individual approval by USDA RMA.
Now that NAP coverage is available for up to 65% of a crop for which crop insurance is not available, it is likely to be easier to get risk protection via NAP rather than Requesting Insurance Not Available in Your County.

How-to instructions for Crop Insurance Tools on USDA RMA website
Cost Estimator: If you want to estimate your own crop insurance costs in your county for your crops, you can use the USDA Risk Management Agency’s Cost Estimator.  We have created a Fact Sheet and step-by-step slides, providing you with detailed instructions on how to enter your data into the on-line estimator.  You can use the estimator anonymously and print your screen to save your results.  If you want to save your results on-line, you have to sign up for a free USDA RMA account first.

How to Use the Information Browser: RMA’s Information Browser is the landing page for all data and web applications available on the RMA public Web site. We have created step-by-step slides, providing you with detailed instructions on how to enter your data into the on-line browser. The Information Browser is where you will find your County Yields to use with the CIDT.

How to Use the Crop Insurance Decision Tool (CIDT): The Crop Insurance Decision Tool is an educational tool to help understand how the Supplemental Coverage Option (SCO) interacts with traditional crop insurance. This tool does not provide an exact quote, but rather generalizes the programs as a first step towards making a purchasing decision. We have created step-by-step slides, with notes, providing you with detailed instructions on how to enter your data into the on-line tool.